01430 873450 office@tmws.co.uk

Curriculum

Welcome to the curriculum pages of our school, for more information please click on the subject titles.  If you need any further clarification please do not hesitate to contact me.

Mr R Harrison

Head Teacher

At The Market Weighton School we follow a curriculum that focuses on academic as well as personal qualities, including students’ social and emotional development. We view both strands as complementary and as such prepare pupils for the society into which they will emerge, a society marked by rapid technological and social change. We believe that all students have an entitlement to a knowledge-rich curriculum regardless of ability or background. The school has 6 core values; Respect, Honesty, Compassion, Resilience, Industry and Courage. These values underpin the day-to-day work of the school. They are modelled by teaching staff and reinforced during lessons and assemblies. 

We offer a supportive and encouraging environment where all students are well cared for and benefit from positive relationships with staff. As a result, students feel secure and able to focus on their learning. We have an inclusive ethos demonstrated by the high numbers of students with SEND, low rates of permanent exclusions and a good track record of enhancing students’ learning who have previously been excluded or educated at home.

Our curriculum has the breadth and depth to ensure our students benefit from a rich experience during their time with us. It is designed to challenge and support all students to achieve the best they can. Students are encouraged to make links between and across topics and subjects so that they can see the ‘bigger picture’ in their learning. In 2018/19 curriculum design was reviewed by all departments with a clear focus on progression, skill development and final outcomes in terms of achievement.  As a result, the curriculum is coherently planned and sequenced as students move through the school.  It allows students to learn new knowledge whilst at the same time understanding how it links to and builds on previous concepts and learning.  Staff use a range of strategies to support this and help students to retain the knowledge they need to develop their cultural capital.

Curriculum organisation
In Year 7 and 8 students follow the full national curriculum supplemented by personal development days when aspects of personal, social, health, sex and relationships education are delivered. During Year 9 students commence GCSEs in the core subjects to allow all who are capable to achieve 3 separate science GCSE’s, English language, English literature and mathematics. For the first term of Year 9 students follow all KS3 foundation subjects with the addition of other subjects available as options at GCSE, before making 4 subject choices to begin in January of Year 9. This gives 2 years and one term to complete up to 10 GCSE’s or equivalent. Each year group has a small number of students studying a modified curriculum, with the same content or similar optional subjects at Level 1 and entry level as appropriate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The curriculum is delivered over a 2 week, 50 period timetable.

In addition to the lessons above, students spend 20 minutes each morning with their Form Tutor.  This time includes a weekly assembly and at least two mornings of silent reading each week.  Homework is set in all subjects on a weekly basis to practice the skills learnt in lessons, deepen understanding and read more widely around each topic.

We believe that the curriculum is ambitious and designed to give all students the knowledge and cultural capital they need to succeed in life. Students can acquire high value GCSEs and we are seeing an increase in students now following the full Ebacc (40% in 2019 compared to 10% in 2017). More students are now taking a modern foreign language and consequently the average Ebacc point score is increasing.  As a small and ambitious school it is vital that we maintain a strong curriculum offer including Arts subjects.  Music GCSE students achieve well and we introduced Drama in 2017 with the 2020 Year 11 cohort.  Teaching additional subjects over an extended KS4 enables us to maintain a broad curriculum and allows our students to follow a curriculum which includes high value academic GCSEs and maintain their passion for the arts and sport. 

Having a strong curriculum leading to a range of formal qualifications also ensures we have the capacity to maintain a breadth of extracurricular activities that all our students and take part in.  In February 2020 the school staged the first musical production for over 15 years and an increasing number of students are playing competitive sport and learning to play musical instruments.

An inclusive curriculum with high expectations of all
Students with high starting points are pushed to achieve the best possible outcomes; a range of additional activities are planned to widen their aspirations, stretch them academically and give them enriching curriculum experiences

Students with SEND are given the opportunity to engage in mainstream education as well as an adapted curriculum which meets their specific learning needs. The growth of our Enhanced Resource Provision for students with Autism and increase in other EHCP admissions has led to the development of a Foundation Learning Group in each year. This group follows a curriculum that mirrors the mainstream curriculum but is adapted to the needs of these students, with a greater focus on functional and life skills. We are flexible in this provision and some of the students in this group will study more challenging content in certain subjects or even go into mainstream lessons for some subjects where this is appropriate; our philosophy is very much if a student can achieve we will do all we can to support them. The school was recognised in 2018 for our efforts to include students with SEND in extra-curricular activities, receiving the regional inclusion award for disability sport. 

There is a strong focus on enhancing the progress of disadvantaged students so that the difference in relation to students’ attainment nationally is continually being eroded. 

Literacy and numeracy as the foundation for the curriculum
Opportunities to develop literacy across the curriculum are extensive with a focus on subject vocabulary, greater use of planning frameworks such as VCOP, and modelling.  All students are encouraged to read for pleasure and reading progress is tracked using Accelerated Reader in Year 7 to 9 with termly STAR assessments measuring gains in reading age and identifying if intervention is needed.  Students whose performance falls below the national benchmark are identified for intervention managed by our dedicated literacy teaching assistant.  Some students will use Lexia, a web based literacy intervention tool, to close reading gaps as quickly as possible, and those needing writing support receive small group or one to one intervention.

We are developing a similar approach to numeracy with termly STAR assessments and a dedicated teaching assistant to lead on intervention to close identified gaps in learning.

GL Assessments in core subjects track progress and give a national benchmark at the start of Year 7 and then in July of Year 7 and 8.  These results inform planning in core subjects to address gaps in learning.  During Year 7 and 8 teachers will report if students are meeting age related expectations in a similar way to Primary years.  From Year 9 onwards assessment is based on the GCSE 9-1 grading system.

A curriculum that develops character
There has been an increased emphasis on the wider curriculum with an increased number of enrichment activities and trips and visits taking place.  In 2017/18 the school became a licenced centre for the delivery of the Duke of Edinburgh Award, built and raced an electric car in the Green Power Project, was recognised in a regional Robotics Challenge competition and performed Blood Brothers at the end of the Summer term.  In 2020 we will perform Hairspray Jnr in February, visit the battlefields of the First World War, and Ski in Italy.  This is in addition to the wide range of sporting, musical and other activities that take place throughout the year. These activities make a key contribution to raising student aspirations increasing levels of engagement in learning and are available to students throughout their time at TMWS.

Staying healthy is important and we place a high priority on promoting physical activity with 2 hours per week of core PE throughout Year 7 to 11 and encouragement to take part in extracurricular sport.  At lunchtimes we provide supervised games as part of our ‘active lunchtimes’.  Each term all Year 7 to 10 students take part in house sport and the whole school walk 13 miles on the annual school walk.  Activities targeted at SEND students ensure our sports curriculum is open to all. 

The Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural (SMSC) and the Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) curriculum has been reviewed in conjunction with the locally agreed RE syllabus to create a ‘Society and Ethics’ curriculum and Personal Development days when the timetable is suspended.  British values are also taught through this curriculum and it has allowed for a range of external agencies to work with students such as Barnardo’s Right to Be workshops tackling LGBTQ+ hate crime and bullying, sexual health, arson awareness, risky behaviours, and relationship education.  In addition, students meet local post 16 providers, and all have a mock interview by a local employer.  As a result, students are better prepared for post 16 choices and able to make a positive contribution to their community.

Preparing for post 16 education and training
Students are well prepared for life beyond school because we ensure that the curriculum remains as broad as possible. This is in part due to the wide curriculum opportunities we offer academically, as well as the focus on developing well rounded individuals with high level social skills and personal attributes that reflect our core values (Respect, Honesty, Compassion, Resilience Industry and Courage). The school offers a well-planned careers programme and achieved the national careers standards in 2018. We meet the Gatsby benchmarks. All students have a careers interview from a level 6 qualified professional and undertake a week of work experience in the summer term of Year 10. We offer unbiased advice on progression to post 16 study resulting in a higher than average proportion of students remaining in post 16 education or training.

This curriculum rationale has been developed in partnership with staff, students and governors.

 

Rationale
English is the subject that allows us to study the breadth and depth of human experience across time and space and therefore is central in supporting our students to develop an understanding of the human condition, leading to empathy, tolerance, and the urge to keep learning.

When students leave TMWS they will:

  • have a thorough appreciation of the disciplines of English Language and English Literature
  • have developed and fulfilled their potential as readers and writers
  • be able to appreciate and apply the key concepts, themes, and ideas that occur across texts and the methods writers use in order to explore them.

Pedagogical Methodology

  • Each topic will begin with an introduction to – and explicit teaching of – key subject knowledge
  • All key aspects of knowledge will be taught explicitly in the unit and formatively assessed throughout. These form the bare minimum of what all students should know and be able to do by the end of the topic, regardless of ability. They will be revisited frequently both within and across topics.
  • Teachers will explicitly highlight links within and between topics – including themes, methods, and generic conventions – to help students develop a deep understanding of the discipline of English Literature
  • English Literature necessarily deals with recurring themes. Teachers will highlight and draw attention to how these themes are dealt with in different texts, making links and drawing comparisons between them. These themes include: Power, Oppression, Love, Relationships, Family , Identity, Class, Gender, Liberty, Tolerance, Morality, Poverty, Ethnicity, and Social Responsibility
  • Students will be given a knowledge organiser at the start of each KS4 topic.
  • Key knowledge will be recapped on a regular basis using low stakes quizzes at the start of most lessons.
  • The learning questions listed should be used to frame episodes of learning (using the Learning Cycle) and students will produce an extended written response to a selection of these (approximately one per fortnight).
  • Each written response to a LQ will receive formative feedback from teachers and/or peers.
  • Criteria based on GCSE mark schemes will be used to inform both the writing and the assessment.
  • Teachers should formatively mark student responses using the agreed department feedback codes.
  • Students will be given the opportunity to make corrections and improvements in green pen after each marking cycle (DIT time).

Rationale of the Geography KS3 Curriculum
To inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Pupils a will acquire knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As pupils progress through Y7 – Y8, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments.

Rationale of the Geography KS4 Curriculum
GCSE enables a variety of teaching and learning approaches. The course studies geography in a balanced framework of physical and human themes and investigates the link between them. Pupils will explore case studies in the United Kingdom (UK), higher income countries (HICs), newly emerging economies (NEEs) and lower income countries (LICs). Topics of study include climate change, poverty, deprivation, global shifts in economic power and the challenge of sustainable resource use. Students are also encouraged to understand their role in society, by considering different viewpoints, values and attitudes. Upon completion of this course, students will have the skills and experience to progress onto A-level and beyond.

When students leave TMWS they will:

  • Developed contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
  • Can understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time
  • Are competent in the geographical skills needed to: collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
  • Can interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
    Be able to communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

Pedagogical Methodology

  • Each topic will begin with an introduction to – and explicit teaching of – key subject knowledge
  • All key aspects of knowledge will be taught explicitly in the unit and formatively assessed throughout. These form the bare minimum of what all students should know and be able to do by the end of the topic, regardless of ability. They will be revisited frequently both within and across topics.
  • Teachers will explicitly highlight links within and between topics.
  • Students will be given a knowledge/topic organiser at the start of each topic.
  • Key knowledge will be recapped on a regular basis using low stakes quizzes at the start of most lessons.
  • The learning questions listed should be used to frame episodes of learning (using the Learning Cycle)
  • Criteria based on GCSE assessment objectives will be used to inform both the writing and the assessment.
  • Teachers should formatively mark student responses using the agreed department feedback codes.
  • Students will be given the opportunity to make corrections and improvements in green pen after each marking cycle (DIT time).

For the full curriculum content please download this file.

Rationale
In order to achieve our aims we have developed a 2 year Key Stage 3 and 3 Year Key Stage 4 Curriculum which is progressive.

The key vehicle for this will be the two Substantive concepts that underpin the History curriculum; ‘Governance’ and ‘Society’. By building the curriculum around these two concepts the ultimate aim of ensuring that pupils Cultural Capital will be enriched. The curriculum is broken into manageable sections for students but also the repetition of inquiry question formats makes recognising the economic, political and social patterns easier. This will allow a mixture of both the Grand Narrative approach to history and the disciplinary approach of interrogating different points of view about the past.

We recognise the importance to imbue or students with knowledge of the impact made by different genders, races, and cultures to our History. Lessons will challenge pupils view of the world enabling them to become global citizens.

In Key Stage 3, in line with the National Curriculum, we have taken a broadly chronological approach. This makes cause and effect easier to recognise and also allows us to harness the power of narrative to aid in knowledge retention.

In Key Stage 4 our curriculum is interleaved based upon the ideas of John Dunlosky so as to promote pupils metacognition and allow for deeper knowledge retention throughout the qualification. Our exam board of choice is the AQA and so as to fit in with our 2 Key Concepts we study; Germany 1890-1945, Conflict & Tension 1894-1918, Britain Health & the People & Elizabethan England 1568-1603.

Intent
The purpose of History at TMWS is to increase the cultural capital of all our students by developing both their knowledge of the wider world and their ability to become rational agents in the society in which they find themselves. Through the study of history, they can learn from the mistakes of those in the past as well as consider how they can best be a force for change today.

Impact

Knowledge

  • To understand the factors which have shaped the modern world in which our students live, macro and micro
  • To understand the development of British values over time
  • To be aware of the positive & negative impact that Britain has had on the wider world and that the wider world has had on Britain
  • To know enough about other periods and cultures not to fall prey to British exceptionalism
  • To understand patterns of cause and effect in history
  • To know key turning points in history, both British and world.

Skills

  • To be able to synthesise ideas from multiple sources of information
  • To demonstrate understanding of second order concepts
  • To be able to understand how & why interpretations came about & to judge their historical merit
  • To understand the key components of source utility

Assessment

Assessment of pupils is based around our 2 key concepts (Governance & Society) and four key skills that will facilitate development in these areas. Our key skills are as follows:
Knowledge, Source Analysis, Interpretations & Second Order Concepts (e.g. significance, change over time).

Assessments are split into 3 kinds.
1. Summative Assessment-Knowledge Tests generating quantitative data.
2. Informal Assessments- Low stakes skills/knowledge practice followed by quality feedback. Contributes towards key skills and allows teachers to monitor progress towards key concepts.
3. Formal Assessment- Based around GCSE question stems, sat in exam style conditions. Quality feedback to follow alongside the collection of quantitative data to inform progress and identify pupils that need further intervention.

For our full curriculum content please download the file below

Rationale
The curriculum ensures that all pupils become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practise with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately. All pupils will reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language. In addition, all pupils will solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.

Mathematics in an interconnected subject in which pupils need to be able to move fluently between representations of mathematical ideas. The programme of study for key stage 3 builds on key stage 2, and the key stage 4 curriculum builds on these. The curriculum is organised into distinct domains, but pupils will build on connections across mathematical ideas to develop fluency, mathematical reasoning and competence in solving increasingly sophisticated problems. They should also apply their mathematical knowledge in science, geography, computing and other subjects.
Pupils who grasp concepts rapidly should be challenged through being offered rich and sophisticated problems before any acceleration through new content in preparation for key stage 4. Those who are not sufficiently fluent should consolidate their understanding, including through additional practice, before moving on.
Pupils will be given opportunity to use calculators when appropriate, and explicitly taught how to use them effectively and efficiently.

What students will know when they leave TMWS
Pupils will develop confidence and competence with mathematical content and apply it flexibly to solve problems in each of the six areas of mathematics.

  • Number
  • Algebra
  • Ratio, proportion and rates of change
  • Geometry and measures
  • Probability
  • Statistics

By the end of year 11, pupils will have the ability to use mathematics successfully in their everyday lives and be able to apply their mathematical knowledge in further education and in their work place.

Upon completion of this course, students will have the skills and experience to progress onto A-level and beyond.

Appropriate mathematical vocabulary will be used by teachers throughout the course, and new vocabulary will be defined when needed.

Pedagogical Methodology
Each topic will begin with recapping previous knowledge before advancing onto new material. Teachers will explicitly highlight links within and between topics including terminology, linking facts, and different ways to approach problems using various applications of previous methods.

The first lesson of each week (with the exception of changing the time for timetabling reasons) is allocated to retrieval practice. In KS4, the full lesson is used for retrieval practise; KS3 will have approximately half the lesson used. Other lessons will have a short ‘Prepare’ activity used to revisit previous knowledge that is linked learning that lesson.

All key aspects of knowledge will be taught explicitly in the unit and formatively assessed throughout. Knowledge and skills will be revisited frequently both within and across year groups.

Students will be given a knowledge organiser at the start of each term.

Criteria based on GCSE assessments will be used to inform teacher assessment. Exam mark schemes will be used by teachers and shared with students when suitable.

Teachers will formatively mark student responses to some classwork and homework using school and department feedback codes.

Students will be given the opportunity to mark corrections and improvements in green pen after each marking cycle (DIT)

Assessments
Common assessments will be sat half-termly by all classes. The data from each of these will be used to feedback to subject leader, and used by class teachers to inform planning for the next term and retrieval practise time.

Across KS3 and KS4, the assessments will comprise of exam board created questions and will use the associated mark schemes.

In KS4, the assessments will be tiered as Foundation/Higher based on students’ previous attainment.

Curriculum overview MATHS Rationale 2019 MATHS

Rationale

Many students at TMWS have a very insular view of the world; they grow up in a predominantly traditional, white, rural background and have little exposure to the wider world, other cultures or other languages.
Most of them have had some primary language instruction but the quantity and quality of that instruction varies tremendously among the different primary schools that feed into TMWS. Specialist language teachers have not delivered most of this instruction.

By the time students leave The Market Weighton School:

 

  • We want to encourage them be curious about the outside world. Students that realise and appreciate that language use reflects cultural ideas, values and beliefs, and are respectful of differences and appreciative of their own culture.
  • They should be able to interact in their second language confidently; exchanging information, ideas and opinions.
  • They will be able to access and respond to written, oral and multimedia input in their second language in both writing and speech.
  • All students will be encouraged to take a modern foreign language to GCSE level.

Pedagogical methodology

Effective teaching in our context is first and foremost how to make the most of the time we have available to build our students’ linguistic competence, self-confidence and motivation adapting what we know about human language acquisition to the context we operate in.

  • Listening is the most important language skill for the development of second language proficiency.
  • In KS3 75% of the time will be spent on listening and speaking.
  • In KS4 there will be a more balanced use of time across all 4 skills.
  • Each topic will be begin using sentence builders and teaching chunks; modelling sentences through listening.
  • A series of read out loud activities will be used later to recycle the chunks (Input flooding e.g. delayed repetition, mind reading, complete the sentence, bad translations, find your match, sentence stealers, spot the difference, spot the difference in translations, oral ping-pong, narrow listening, delayed translation, etc.
  • Then a series of activities will focus on a very structured production with plenty of chances to continue to practice the same chunks (Push output e.g. narrow translations, pyramid translations, one pen one dice, double translations, no snakes no ladders, fluency cards.
  • Assess at this point, if students have learned all the chunks. If not secure, continue flooding.
  • Key aspects of grammar will be taught explicitly after students have implicitly learned the target sentence pattern.
  • Teachers will recycle language in order to create links between the different units to help students develop complexity, spontaneity and fluency.
  • Language will be re-capped on a regular basis at the beginning of most lessons.

Rationale

Music is a powerful, unique form of communication that can change the way pupils feel, think and act. It brings together intellect and feeling and enables personal expression, reflection and emotional development.
As an integral part of culture, past and present, it helps pupils understand themselves and relate to others, forging important links between the home, school and the wider world.

The teaching of music develops pupils’ ability to listen and appreciate a wide variety of music and to make judgements about musical quality. It encourages active involvement in different forms of music making, both individual and communal, developing a sense of group identity and togetherness.
As an inclusive school the arts are a valuable means of developing confidence and communication skills, and facilitating expression, ideas and feelings. In addition, through purposeful, imaginative and creative activities, pupils learn to take managed risks, trying out new ideas and new ways of working without fear of failure.

Intent

By the time a student leaves TMWS the will have been able to:

  • take peripatetic lessons in an instrument of their choice
  • perform as part of a group including percussion ensemble, guitar ensemble, string ensemble, brass ensemble, keyboard ensemble or choir
  • perform music in solo, duet and larger group settings
  • perform in a variety of venues including church, outdoor, and larger venues
  • learn how to use music technology software to record, edit, and develop their work
  • study how to compose music and create several pieces of their own work
  • study the work of famous composers from throughout music history and look at the development of music and musical instruments since the medieval period
  • study music theory throughout Key Stage 3, and in greater depth at KS4 should they choose music at GCSE level
  • develop an appreciation of music by learning how to critically listen to music, analyse and understand how music works
  • experience music in both live and recorded form, with enrichment from visiting live performances where appropriate

Implementation
Delivery of this educational journey will comprise of lessons based around Core Knowledge, Performance, Composition and Appraisal, for the full content please download the file below.

Rationale
The intent of the Design and Technology curriculum is to be the catalyst of a student’s curiosity, creativity and imagination. Design and technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject, which enables students to apply knowledge and skills when designing and making products. Students solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. Students acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Students learn how to take risks and be innovative. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, students develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life in the wider world.

When students leave TMWS they will have, the core skills and expertise needed to equip them throughout their life and career choices.

Pedagogical Methodology

  • The content of the Design and Technology curriculum will be delivered through the Core principles and Specialist technical principles.   Each topic will begin with an introduction and explicit teaching of key subject knowledge.
  • All key aspects of knowledge will be taught explicitly in the unit and formatively assessed throughout. These form the bare minimum of what all students should know and be able to do by the end of the topic, regardless of ability. They will be revisited frequently both within and across topics.
  • Each topic will begin with an introduction to – and explicit teaching of – key subject knowledge
  • All key aspects of knowledge will be taught explicitly in the unit and formatively assessed throughout. These form the bare minimum of what all students should know and be able to do by the end of the topic, regardless of ability. They will be revisited frequently both within and across topics.
  • Teachers will explicitly highlight links within and between topics.
  • Key knowledge will be recapped on a regular basis using low stakes quizzes at the start of most lessons.
  • Criteria based on GCSE assessment objectives will be used to inform both the writing and the assessment.
  • Teachers should formatively mark student responses using the agreed department feedback codes.
  • Students will be given the opportunity to make corrections and improvements in green pen after each marking cycle (DIT time).

Rationale
The purpose of the Society & Ethics curriculum is to provide the students of The Market Weighton School with the cultural capital to have as many options as possible when leaving at the end of Year 11.

Market Weighton is a traditional rural market town that places great importance on the local community. However, this often leads students to display insular perspectives of other cultures and religions.

When students leave TMWS they will:

  • Be able to think critically and question information and the sources of that information.
  • Feel empathy towards other and to consider the feelings and thoughts of different individuals.
  • See all arguments as two sided and to evaluate the strength of evidence in order to form fully justified conclusions.
  • Understand their place in the world as global citizens and to consider the major challenges that society faces.
  • Be able to clearly and effectively articulate their thoughts either verbally or written with a particular focus on the development of explanations and reasoning

Pedagogical Methodology

  • Through the promotion of verbal discussion about the subject content and ‘big’ questions.
  • Through the thematic delivery of content in order to ensure that previous knowledge is integrated into new topics.
  • An expectation that students take an interest in current affairs and are aware of major global events and their significance.
  • Regular and thorough assessment that is used to monitor progress and influence intervention and future teaching.
  • Focus on the importance and value of reading from different sources and for different purposes, exposing students to a wide range of sources.
  • Exposure to different environments through educational visits and guest speakers to increase the cultural capital of students, particularly those from a disadvantaged background.
  • An expectation that students complete quality extended written work on a regular basis to demonstrate and develop explanative and evaluative skills.
  • Through a full and varied curriculum that promotes the fundamental British values.
Rationale.
Social Care is a growing sector that offers a wide range of job opportunities, the NHS alone has over 1.3 million staff with over 350 careers on offer, with over half a million extra jobs on offer by 2030. Studying Health and Social Care at GCSE will give students the foundation knowledge to begin a career in the sector. It will equip them with the skills to listen, empathise and understand human behaviours, that can be often overlooked.

Learners will be provided with essential knowledge, transferable skills and tools to improve their learning in other subjects with the aim of enhancing their employability when they leave education, contributing to both their personal development and future economic well-being.

When students leave TMWS
• Students will have the essential knowledge and understanding in Health and Social Care
• Have sound specialist knowledge and skills for everyday use.
• Have transferable skills including researching, planning, observing and evaluating skills

Pedagogical Methodology

• Each topic will begin with an introduction to – and explicit teaching of – key subject knowledge
• Will a challenge all learners, including high attaining learners, by introducing them to demanding material and skills; encouraging independence and creativity; providing tasks that engage with the most taxing aspects of the National Curriculum
• The hands-on approach that will be required for both teaching and learning will chime appropriately with the way young people use new technology and will underpin a highly valid approach to the assessment of their skills as is borne by what teachers tell us.
• will allow learners the freedom to explore more deeply the things that interest them as well as providing good opportunity to enhance their learning in a range of curriculum areas.
• Regular and thorough assessment will be used to monitor progress and influence intervention and future teaching.
• Students will be given the opportunity to make corrections and improvements in green pen after each marking cycle (DIT time).

Child Development. Cambridge Nationals Level1/2.

Rationale.

Quality childcare will always be in demand all around the world on many different levels. From nannies to therapists, this field offers a wide range of options into childcare. It is designed with both practical and theoretical elements, which will prepare students for further qualifications in Child Care, Health and Social Care, Psychology, Sociology and Biology. Allowing opportunities to develop a critical and analytical approach to decision making and problem solving in relation to specific content while examining issues that affect the quality of human life including an appreciation of diversity.

When students leave TMWS they will:

  • Students will have the essential knowledge and understanding in child development
  • Evaluation skills which they will carry through to further study
  • students will gain an understanding of the development norms from birth to five years and the stages and benefits of play
  • Students will gain knowledge of, and skills in, developing activities to observe development norms in children up to the age of five.
  • Transferable skills including researching, planning, observing and evaluating skills 

Pedagogical Methodology

  • Each topic will begin with an introduction to – and explicit teaching of – key subject knowledge
  • Students will be able to build a foundation to link to their further study
  • Students will have access to guest speakers from professionals from the sector which will allow them to gain relevant understanding from first hand experience.
  • Students will participate in practical activities to embed teaching
  • Students will be given time and guidance to develop independent learning through research based activities
  • Regular and thorough assessment will be used to monitor progress and influence intervention and future teaching.
  • Students will be given the opportunity to make corrections and improvements in green pen after each marking cycle (DIT time).

Core PE Rationale
The main focus of the Core PE curriculum at TMWS is to encourage pupils to enjoy and have a passion for the subject. Alongside this we want students to broaden their knowledge and skills across a wide range of sports.

Core PE Intent
When students leave TMWS they will:
• Know all the core skills in all sports covered and had the opportunity to learn and perform both core and advanced skills
• Have awareness of different types of physical activity and sports
• Had experience at leading in lessons through- umpiring, scoring/ officiating
• We want our pupils to enjoy Physical Education and want to continue exercise and physical activity for life long participation.

GCSE PE Rationale
The main intent of the PE GCSE curriculum is to use a variety of teaching techniques and lessons to enable students to access a balanced and broad experience. This will be through teaching OCR GCSE specification.
Pupils will learn and explore a variety of topics- Ranging from bio-mechanics to drugs in sport. Allowing for pupils to gain knowledge across the whole spectrum of sport and physical activity. Upon completion students will have the skills to progress onto post 16 study through either A-levels of BTEC.

GCSE PE Intent
When students leave TMWS they will:
• Developed contextual knowledge of a wide range of topics.
• Are competent in the PE skills needed to: State (AO1) Explain (AO2) Evaluate and link practically (AO3)
• Had the opportunity to focus on 3 sports and refine skills through learning and performing with a wide range of core and advanced skills.

Pedagogical Methodology
• Each topic will begin with an introduction to – and explicit teaching of – key subject knowledge
• All key aspects of knowledge will be taught explicitly in the unit and formatively assessed throughout using topic tests.
• Retrieval is a departmental focus and use of metacognition techniques they will be revisited frequently both within and across topics.
• Teachers will explicitly highlight links within and between topics.
• Students will be given a I need to know check list at the start of every topic and will be given a revision folder for revision cards to be placed into.
• Key knowledge will be recapped on a regular basis using low stakes quizzes.
• Criteria based on GCSE assessment objectives will be used to inform both the writing and the assessment.
• Teachers should formatively mark student responses using the agreed department feedback codes.
• Students will be given the opportunity to make corrections and improvements in green pen after each marking cycle (DIRT time).

Rationale
We aim to create the very best Business studies students. The aim of the curriculum is to develop students’ understanding of how the local / national / global economy works through analysing economic issues, problems and institutions that affect everyday life.

The aim of the Business studies curriculum is to equip students with the appropriate knowledge and skills needed to develop their employability and identify business problems and opportunities. We do this by quality first teaching which ensures students understand underlying Economic and Business theory which students apply to a variety of familiar and unfamiliar case studies.

We want students to be able to think analytically, reach logical conclusions based on data, and make judgements on future changes to markets and the economy.
Our curriculum goes beyond what is taught in lessons, for whilst we want students to achieve the very best examination results possible, we believe our curriculum goes beyond what is examinable. Our curriculum in Business studies supports the ethos statement of the school. Students are constantly challenged to work collaboratively and think independently when engaging in all lessons and class debates.

Through teacher modelling, we encourage our students to demonstrate manners, respect and tolerance in lessons. This allows students to express themselves in a confident manner.

As a knowledge based curriculum we believe that knowledge underpins and enables the application of skills; both are entwined. Content is delivered to students and then built upon through a variety of practice questions, with regular quality feedback being given to support student progress. The knowledge acquired then allows students to develop their analytical and critical thinking skills.

Cultural Capital is embedded throughout the Social Sciences curriculum. Our students are constantly introduced to a wide variety of viewpoints from some of the most influential entrepreneurs throughout history. We investigate the impact that their work has had on the world we live in and students are encouraged to make links between their studies and real life examples. Students undertake this whilst developing an increased understanding into current events happening globally.
In addition to our aims, our curriculum design includes revisiting and building on existing knowledge. We ensure the level of challenge is high enough for the most able, with scaffold and support available for students who need it.

The national curriculum for Business aims to ensure that all pupils:
• to understand more about the business world. They should enable students to develop as commercially minded and enterprising individuals who think critically, drawing on business information and evidence to develop arguments and make justified decisions.
• GCSE specifications in business should motivate and challenge students, and prepare them to make informed decisions about further study and career pathways. 4. GCSE specifications in business should enable students to:
• know and understand business concepts, business terminology, business objectives, the integrated nature of business activity and the impact of business on individuals and wider society
• apply knowledge and understanding to contemporary business issues and to different types and sizes of businesses in local, national and global contexts
• develop as enterprising individuals with the ability to think commercially and creatively to demonstrate business acumen, and draw on evidence to make informed business decisions and solve business problems
• develop as effective and independent students, and as critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring minds
• use an enquiring, critical approach to make informed judgements
• investigate and analyse real business opportunities and issues to construct well argued, well-evidenced, balanced and structured arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of business
• develop and apply quantitative skills relevant to business, including using and interpreting data.

GCSE specifications in business should motivate and challenge students, and prepare them to make informed decisions about further study and career pathways.

Skills and Knowledge
We aim to teach the course using a range of environments, classroom, virtual, online, trips, speakers, theory and revision based lessons. We aim to give a wide range of skills to meet the needs of pupils when they join the world of work, equipping them with skills and knowledge for future lessons in a range of subjects.
We will deliver lessons in a number of ways, teaching the pupils with the use of a presentation, shared work with pupils via Impero, Google Classroom or paper based tasks.

Pupils in business are required to:
• use business terminology to identify and explain business activity
• apply business concepts to familiar and unfamiliar contexts
• develop problem solving and decision making skills relevant to business
• investigate, analyse and evaluate business opportunities and issues
• make justified decisions using both qualitative and quantitative data including its selection, interpretation, analysis and evaluation, and the application of appropriate quantitative skills

Topics
The key areas of the course are broken down in to two parts, two exams:
1. 1: Business Activity
2. Influences on business
3. Business Operations
4. Finance
5. Marketing
6. Human resources
7. Globalisation

Key vocabulary
Business Studies has language that is specific to it, pupils will be guided to these in lessons. They will be supported to understand them and demonstrate their use in lessons. It is expected that pupils will learn spellings and teachers will support with misconceptions.

Pedagogical Methodology
• Each topic will begin with an introduction to – and explicit teaching of – key subject knowledge
• All key aspects of knowledge will be taught explicitly in the unit and formatively assessed throughout. These form the bare minimum of what all students should know and be able to do by the end of the topic, regardless of ability. They will be revisited frequently both within and across topics.
• Teachers will explicitly highlight links within and between topics.
• Key knowledge will be recapped on a regular with the use of quizzes and seen through student skills.
• Teachers should formatively mark student responses using the agreed department feedback codes, this can be online or in folders for KS4.
• Students will be given the opportunity to make corrections and improvements on google classroom after each marking cycle (DIT time).

Start and End of Unit Tests
At the start and end of each unit of work students complete a check in and check out quiz. Scores are recorded to allow teaching staff to see progress I the unit.
In the units pupils will be presented with a range of exam style questions which are marked appropriately to support exam technique and revision.

Staff look for WWW Strengths, and EBI weaknesses in relation to the work and feedback, we expect this will feedback into their work for the following unit.
Through this exercise students are able to reflect on their own progress and also rectify any misconceptions they may have about the unit studied.

Rationale
It is the aim of the department to enable students to develop skills and knowledge in computer science and digital technologies to prepare them for a future in a world where the use of this technology is fully embodied. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. We wish to enthuse students to have an understanding far deeper than the interface that they currently operate.

We aim to enable students to develop a love of learning for the subject and an understanding that there are no limits to their own development in programming and IT. An important life skill for anyone is to problem solve. Using the strands of computational thinking this will aid learners with their Computer Science studies and, as it is embedded within everyday life activities, they will understand the importance of taking a risk and acting upon the outcome, positive or negative. Students will be given guidance on how to work safely on-line so that it will be second nature to carry out all the necessary steps for their own safety as well as those around them.

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:
• can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
• can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
• can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
• are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

At KS3 students will be given the opportunity to develop their computer coding and digital technology skills. Learning the language of code or developing strong IT skills is important to students as they will be able to use, build and create using their own knowledge. This will allow them to take their studies onto KS4 and to Further and Higher education if they desire and ultimately secure a career within a large range of industries in a digital world.

Skills and Knowledge
We aim to teach the course in a digital environment. KS3 primarily will be based on practical lessons as this supports the hardware and software required to meet the needs of the curriculum and building skills for pupils to utilise in future lessons and other subjects.
We will deliver lessons in a number of ways, teaching the pupils with the use of a presentation, shared work with pupils via Impero, Google Classroom or paper based tasks.

We hope pupils arrive at TMWS with the skills needed to complete basic computer tasks. Pupils will be able to log on, create, open and save files. These skills will be monitored in the first few lessons and linked to the initial unit of work in September covering E safety to ensure pupils are able to protect their online identity and privacy, recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns.

In Year 7, students will need to be confident in using Microsoft and Google suites, having a clear understanding of selecting the correct software to complete a task. Students will be introduced to Computing basics, how computers are made up of different components, Binary and Boolean logic. Students will also develop a website using HTML and repurpose digital artefacts for a specific audience with the support of Photoshop.

This is broken down into:
1. E Safety
2. Vodafone App Challenge
3. Scratch
4. How computers work
5. Small Basic
6. Photoshop

Year 8, students will develop their confidence further and understand programming as we develop skills using spreadsheets, using Excel and introduce text based programming with small basic and developing skills with Adventure Game programming, to ensure a clear understanding of text based programming.

This is broken down into:
1. E Safety
2. Spreadsheets
3. Binary
4. Computational Thinking and Logic gates
5. Adventure Game, modular Programming
6. Algorithm/Flowol

KS4
Pupils will be taught to
• develop their capability, creativity and knowledge in computer science, digital media and information technology
• develop and apply their analytic, problem-solving, design, and computational thinking skills
• understand how changes in technology affect safety, including new ways to protect their online privacy and identity, and how to report a range of concerns.

We offer both BTEC ICT and Computing GCSE courses.
Computing OCR encourage students/ to understand the fundamental principles of Computer Science, analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience.

Think creatively, innovatively, logically and critically.
Understand the components that make up digital systems, how they communicate with each other
Understand the impacts of digital technology to the individual and wider society
Apply mathematical; skills relevant to CS.

BTEC ICT, new course Tech Award Digital Information Technology has been running for one year. First examined in 2021. As a vocational qualification students are can draw on knowledge acquired from other subjects, English, Maths and Science and other GCSE where appropriate allowing students to broaden their knowledge and opportunity to apply skills to everyday work contexts.

Two internal and one external assessment make up the course, this helps to develop pupils resilience and planning skills to meet deadlines. Units are linked to KS3 knowledge of computer systems, software applications, creating programs and develop understanding of how to represent information in different ways to give it meaning. The third unit will build on student knowledge of how to use technology responsibly, digital organisations and cyber security. The third unit also builds on knowledge, understanding and skills acquired and developed during the course, assessed with 1hr 30 min assessment.

Both course will be taught using the same technology and pedagogy as KS3. We will teach in a computer suit using the computers when necessary. Some lessons will lend themselves to group work, paper based work, online tests and research. Lesson resources will be shared in the same way pupil are experienced with, Impero Downloads, Google Classroom and email.

Key vocabulary
Both subject have language that is specific to them, pupils will be guided to these in lessons. They will be supported to understand them and demonstrate their use in lessons. It is expected that pupils will learn spellings and teachers will support with misconceptions.

Pedagogical Methodology
• Each topic will begin with an introduction to – and explicit teaching of – key subject knowledge
• All key aspects of knowledge will be taught explicitly in the unit and formatively assessed throughout. These form the bare minimum of what all students should know and be able to do by the end of the topic, regardless of ability. They will be revisited frequently both within and across topics.
• Teachers will explicitly highlight links within and between topics.
• Key knowledge will be recapped on a regular with the use of quizzes and seen through student skills.
• Teachers should formatively mark student responses using the agreed department feedback codes, this can be online or in folders for KS4.
• Students will be given the opportunity to make corrections and improvements on google classroom after each marking cycle (DIT time).

Science

Rationale: GCSE study in the sciences provides the foundations for understanding the material world. Scientific understanding is changing our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all students should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. They should be helped to appreciate how the complex and diverse phenomena of the natural world can be described in terms of a small number of key ideas relating to the sciences which are both inter-linked, and are of universal application. These key ideas include the use of conceptual models and theories to make sense of the observed diversity of natural phenomena the assumption that every effect has one or more cause that change is driven by differences between different objects and systems when they interact that many such interactions occur over a distance without direct contact that science progresses through a cycle of hypothesis, practical experimentation, observation, theory development and review that quantitative analysis is a central element both of many theories and of scientific methods of inquiry.

Intent:

When students leave TMWS they will:

• Have developed scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
• Have developed an understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science, through different types of scientific enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
• Have developed and learnt to apply observational, practical, modelling, enquiry and problem-solving skills, both in the laboratory, in the field and in other learning environments
• Have developed their ability to evaluate claims based on science through critical analysis of the methodology, evidence and conclusions, both qualitatively and quantitatively.

Pedagogical Methodology:

• Each topic will begin with an introduction to – and explicit teaching of – key subject knowledge
• All key aspects of knowledge will be taught explicitly in the unit and formatively assessed throughout. These form the bare minimum of what all students should know and be able to do by the end of the topic, regardless of ability. They will be revisited frequently both within and across topics.
• Teachers will explicitly highlight links within and between topics.
• Students will be given the opportunity to carry out practical activities.
• Key knowledge will be recapped on a regular basis using low stakes quizzes at the start of most lessons.
• The learning questions listed should be used to frame episodes of learning (using the Learning Cycle)
• Criteria based on GCSE assessment objectives will be used to inform both the writing and the assessment.
• Each written response to a LQ will receive formative feedback from teachers and/or peers.
• Teachers should formatively mark student responses using the agreed department feedback codes.
• Students will be given the opportunity to make corrections and improvements in green pen after each marking cycle (DIT time)

Assessments
Common assessments will be sat per topic by all classes. The data from each of these will be used to feedback to subject leader, and used by class teachers to inform planning for the next term and retrieval practise time.
Across KS3 and KS4, the assessments will comprise of exam board created questions and will use the associated mark schemes.
In KS4, the assessments will be tiered as Foundation/Higher based on students’ previous attainment.

The Department for Education is introducing compulsory Relationships Education for primary pupils and Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) for secondary pupils from September 2020. Also, from September 2020 it will be compulsory for all schools to teach Health Education.

At The Market Weighton School we have always had a strong PSHE, SMSC and RSE curriculum offer.  We have now enhanced our existing practice to ensure we comply with the new guidance.

As part of this curriculum development we have consulted with parents, students, governors and the local community.  We have formed an RSE Steering Group which is made up of staff and parents who will regularly review our curriculum offer, ensuring our curriculum meets the needs of our students.

Please download the file below to view our full curriculum map.

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